Broad Stripe c.1825

A classic ‘Roman’ or Regency proportion stripe originally produced in the 18th Century using the ‘open trough’ method, in which the stripes were created by bands of paint seeping through holes or slots in the bottom of a wooden trough, onto the surface of the paper as it was pulled beneath. Striped wallpapers manufactured in this way are characterised by a brushed finish which was later superseded by a flatter print achieved with 19th Century rollers, as is evidenced in these papers. The grand scale of this particular stripe is tempered by the restricted use of colour – in each case the stripe sits on a softer ground of the same hue, creating a wallpaper that brings a relaxed structure to a room, without being too formal.