Little Greene Paint & Wallpaper Blog

  • ‘London Wallpapers V’ Launch

    Marketing Director Ruth Mottershead

     

    Our latest wallpaper collection, ‘London Wallpapers V’ launched at this year’s Paris Déco Off, receiving an overwhelming response.

     

    'Brodsworth' window display

     

    The Little Greene Paris Showroom’s window display featured the striking bird from ‘Brodsworth’, a new design that’s available in 3 colourways.

    The lively and engaging design features a delicate floral motif which surrounds the bird. This wallpaper was found at Brodsworth Hall in South Yorkshire, an elegant, Victorian home belonging to the Thellusson family.

     

    'London Wallpapers V' wallpaper dresses

     

    Visitors were able to browse the complete collection, with the help of our wallpaper dresses which were made out of the designs.

    The showroom hosted an evening to celebrate the launch with drinks, canapés and a live music.

     

    Live music at Little Greene Paris Showroom

     

    Our colour experts were on hand to provide assistance and inspiration on pairing the new wallpapers with paint colours. Colour Consultant, Sophie Neveu, held one to one consultancy sessions with guests, assisting them with their latest projects.

     

    Little Greene Paris Showroom

     

    Thank you to all that attended the launch!

    Click here to order a free wallpaper sample.

  • Colour Consultancy Taster Sessions

     

    We are now offering complimentary colour consultancy taster sessions from our Chelsea showroom every Monday.

    Colour consultancy suite

    The 10 minute session is the perfect opportunity to meet with our colour expert and find out more about the range of colour consultancy services we offer.

    You’ll receive full information on our ‘In Home’ and ‘In Store’ packages from the comfort of our luxury consultancy suite.

    To book a taster session, call the Chelsea showroom on 0208 016 5380.

  • Wallpaper focus: London Wallpapers V

     

    Wallpaper: Brook Street – Etruscan
    Left Wall & Stairs: Lamp Black 228
    Ceiling & Trim: Tuscan Red 140

     

    ‘Brook Street’ sits on a lightly brushed ground and incorporates a soft texture within its motif.

    The woven cane-like design is typical of the late 19th century. The Etruscan colourway can be used in combination with black for a contemporary finish. This hallway features contrasting ‘Jack Black’ woodwork and the chalky and intense, deep terracotta, ‘Tuscan Red’.

     

    Wallpaper: New Bond Street – Hide
    Wall: Chocolate Colour 124
    Fireplace: True Taupe 240

     

    Based on one of the oldest surviving documents in English Heritage’s wallpaper archive, ‘New Bond Street’ originates from an embossed leather wall hanging which actually predates wallpaper.

    This bold motif combines with the soft neutral, ‘True Taupe’ on woodwork and the rich ‘Chocolate Colour’ which adds warmth and  depth to the scheme.

     

    Wallpaper: Bedford Square – Acorn
    Window Frame & Skirting: Acorn 87
    Right Door Frame: Puck 298

     

    ‘Bedford Square’ is a design typical of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. New colourways include an uplifting green option that incorporates the Little Greene shades ‘Acorn’, ‘Acorn Mid’ and ‘Puck’.

    In this study space, the design is combined with a bolder colour, ‘Puck’ on the doorframe and the subtlety of Acorn-Mid on the skirting. Pair the floral design with rustic wooden furniture to create a look that is reminiscent of the outdoors.

  • Little Greene at Paris Déco Off

     

    At this year’s Paris Déco Off, the Little Greene showroom will welcome visitors to the launch of London Wallpapers V from 17th to 21st January.

     

    Little Greene Paris Showroom

     

    The showroom will be decorated with the 11 designs from ‘London Wallpapers V,’ which include 4 new designs and 15 fresh colourways from seven existing patterns found in London Wallpapers II and III.

     

    Paris Déco Off 2018

     

    Our expert colour consultants will be running a series of colour workshops on Thursday 17th and Friday 18th January to guide visitors through the Little Greene palette. Create your perfect ‘London Wallpapers V’ scheme with the help of our experts, who will be providing advice on combining colour and wallpaper.

     

    London Wallpapers V Press Preview

     

    On Saturday 12th January, the launch will be celebrated at the showroom with a drinks reception and live music, where guests can also discover the new collection.

    Our colour workshops can be booked here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/atelier-couleurs-et-papiers-peints-tickets-53807911913

    We look forward to welcoming you to the showroom.

  • Explore our new collection - London Wallpapers V

     

    In January 2019 we will be launching our 13th wallpaper collection, London Wallpapers V – a compendium of heritage designs to complement our existing wallpaper collections.

     

    Wilton - Pad

     

    Spanning 250 years of interior decoration (from 1690 to the mid 20th century), ‘London Wallpapers V’ is a compendium of authentic heritage designs, each one sensitively remodelled and expertly coloured for the 21st century home.

    With one exception, the 11 designs in the collection are based on fragments stored in English Heritage’s wallpaper archive at Wrest Park in Bedfordshire, which were removed and preserved during the conservation of 18th and 19th century London houses.

    The exception is a first for Little Greene and English Heritage – the original design still hangs on the walls at Brodsworth Hall, an elegant and faithfully conserved Victorian country house in South Yorkshire.

    The oldest source material for London Wallpapers V actually pre-dates wallpaper: a decorative piece of leather from 1690 that would have been displayed as a hanging mural rather than glued to a wall. Other remnants include hand-blocked damasks, delicate neoclassical fragments, hand-stencilled patterns and authentic designs from the Georgian and Arts & Crafts periods.
    London Wallpapers V introduces four previously unseen designs and amalgamates seven popular patterns from London Wallpapers II and III, which have been updated with the addition of 15 fresh colourways.

     

    NEW DESIGNS

     

    Brodsworth - Empress

     

    Brodsworth c.1863 – 3 colourways

    A lively and engaging design featuring striking birds and delicate floral motifs. Slightly raised and incorporating rich gilding detail, the pattern was originally designed to be an imitation of stamped leather. Based on early-18th century French textiles and furnishings, encompassing panels, scrolls and cross hatching, this wallpaper was found at Brodsworth Hall in South Yorkshire, an elegant, Victorian home belonging to the Thellusson family. Used in both the library and the morning room in reverse colourways, this paper was certainly a family favourite and can still be seen in situ today.

     

     

    Brook Street - Etruscan

     

     

    Brook Street c.1895 – 5 colourways

    In entirely different eras, two neighbouring houses in Mayfair’s fashionable Brook Street were homes to the baroque composer George Frideric Handel and rock musician Jimi Hendrix. Hendrix spent some of his short-lived musical career in a flat at No. 23, the same property from which this pattern hails. The woven cane-like design is typical of the late 19th century: an all-over pattern, which sits on a lightly brushed ground and incorporates a soft texture within its motif.

     

     

    Carlton House Terrace - Blue Plume

     

    Carlton House Terrace c.1885 – 5 colourways

    A flamboyant peacock feather design, found in the attics of 18 Carlton House Terrace, a beautiful stucco-faced London town house overlooking The Mall. Originally machine-printed in green on a yellow background, the contemporary surface-printed technique used to recreate it accurately reflects the original, whilst a judicious splash of colour in the feather provides something on which to anchor a contemporary scheme.

     

    St James's Park - Suede Fade

     

    St James’s Park c.1940 – 4 colourways

    This large damask pattern was found in Marlborough House, next to St James’s Park, a grand abode designed by Christopher Wren and home to the Duchess of Marlborough, friend and confidante of Queen Anne. Originally a dark blue flock on a pale blue ground, the paper is believed to be comparatively recent, though the origins of the general design are Victorian (as a
    wallpaper) and older still (as a silk fabric). The twist in this interpretation is the light-to-dark ombré effect, which puts bolder colour at the base of the wall and lighter above, with the effect of making a space feel taller and lighter than it would with a conventional damask design. It is a panel design, with three panels making up one full repeat.

     

    EXISTING DESIGNS

     

    Bedford Square - Acorn

     

    Bedford Square c.1900 – LWII 3 existing and 2 new colourways

    One of the most impressive squares in London, Bedford Square was originally laid out in 1775–6 and, until World War II, the majority of its houses were inhabited by lawyers, architects, publishers and other professionals. The original of this paper was saved from a property in the square, and is of a design typical of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. New colourways include an uplifting green option that incorporates Acorn, Acorn Mid and Puck. The fresh background combined with the dark green fine line of Puck gives the design a more contemporary look and feel. There is also a pink option with a China Clay background and
    soft, feminine Hellebore and Blush highlights.

     

    Lansdowne Walk - Nordic

     

    Lansdowne Walk c.1910 – LWII 1 existing and 4 new colourways

    An Arts & Crafts motif in the manner of Voysey, a leading light of the movement who was perhaps more famous as an architect than as a wallpaper designer. Although this colourful wallpaper was removed from a 19th century house in Kensington, its actual design dates it to the early 20th century.

     

     

    Lauderdale - Stone

     

    Lauderdale c.1820 – LWII 2 existing and 1 new colourway

    This paper, a variation on a striped theme, dates from around 1820, although the original fragment was discovered in a 16th century property, Lauderdale House on Highgate Hill, overlooking Hampstead Heath. The design results from stencilling as opposed to block printing: a plain green paper would have been put up on a hessian scrim stretched over the wall and then stencilled in situ.

     

     

    Lower George St - Carousel

     

    Lower George St c.1810 – LWII 3 existing and 2 new colourways

    An abstract paper, which, despite its contemporary appearance, probably dates from the early 1800s when such designs were hugely popular. The original colourway, featuring orangey stars on a pinky-yellow ground, was discovered on an upper floor of a commercial building that had been refaced in the early 19th century but was most probably a much older building.

     

    Marlborough - Glacé

     

    Marlborough c.1915 – LWII 4 existing and 2 new colourways

    A large-scale pattern, reminiscent of an early-20th century interpretation of one of Robert Adam’s designs. This paper was discovered just after the death of Queen Mary, who lived in Marlborough House until 1953, after which the house became the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat.

     

    New Bond Street - Hide

     

    New Bond Street c.1690 – LWIII 4 existing colourways

    Based on one of the oldest surviving documents in English Heritage’s wallpaper archive, this fragment from an embossed leather wall hanging actually predates wallpaper. Panels of embossed and painted leather, usually with a floral pattern, were popular though expensive modes of decoration in the late 16th and 17th centuries. These panels were sewn together to create large-scale decorative hangings, in much the same way that drops of wallpaper are hung side-by-side to create a more impressive statement.

     

     

    Wilton - Pad

     

    Wilton c.1760 – LWIII 3 existing and 4 new colourways
    A classic damask design that is very typical of the popular large-scale pomegranate patterns of the mid 18th century, this would originally have been a flock wallpaper and hung in a grand English home. Flock papers were an English speciality, being in effect imitations of expensive textiles, which were nonetheless costly to produce. As a result, they came to represent a confident statement of luxury and social status.

     

     

  • London Wallpapers V: Four New Designs

     

    London Wallpapers V introduces four previously unseen designs and amalgamates seven popular patterns from London Wallpapers II and III, which have been updated with the addition of 15 fresh colourways.

    Below we detail the provenances of each new design. All have been sensitively remodelled and expertly coloured for the 21st century home.

     

    Brodsworth - Empress

     

    Brodsworth c.1863 – 3 colourways

    A lively and engaging design featuring striking birds and delicate floral motifs. Slightly raised and incorporating rich gilding detail, the pattern was originally designed to be an imitation of stamped leather. Based on early-18th century French textiles and furnishings, encompassing panels, scrolls and cross hatching, this wallpaper was found at Brodsworth Hall in South Yorkshire, an elegant, Victorian home belonging to the Thellusson family. Used in both the library and the morning room in reverse colourways, this paper was certainly a family favourite and can still be seen in situ today.

     

    Brook Street - Etruscan

     

    Brook Street c.1895 – 5 colourways

    In entirely different eras, two neighbouring houses in Mayfair’s fashionable Brook Street were homes to the baroque composer George Frideric Handel and rock musician Jimi Hendrix. Hendrix spent some of his short-lived musical career in a flat at No. 23, the same property from which this pattern hails. The woven cane-like design is typical of the late 19th century: an all-over pattern, which sits on a lightly brushed ground and incorporates a soft texture within its motif.

     

    Carlton House Terrace - Blue Plume

     

    Carlton House Terrace c.1885 – 5 colourways

    A flamboyant peacock feather design, found in the attics of 18 Carlton House Terrace, a beautiful stucco-faced London town house overlooking The Mall. Originally machine-printed in green on a yellow background, the contemporary surface-printed technique used to recreate it accurately reflects the original, whilst a judicious splash of colour in the feather provides something on which to anchor a contemporary scheme.

     

    St James's Park - Suede Fade

     

    St James’s Park c.1940 – 4 colourways

    This large damask pattern was found in Marlborough House, next to St James’s Park, a grand abode designed by Christopher Wren and home to the Duchess of Marlborough, friend and confidante of Queen Anne. Originally a dark blue flock on a pale blue ground, the paper is believed to be comparatively recent, though the origins of the general design are Victorian (as a wallpaper) and older still (as a silk fabric). The twist in this interpretation is the light-to-dark ombré effect, which puts bolder colour at the base of the wall and lighter above, with the effect of making a space feel taller and lighter than it would with a conventional damask design. It is a panel design, with three panels making up one full repeat.

  • Little Greene at The Whitworth

     

    Contemporary textile artist, Alice Kettle selected Little Greene shades for her current exhibit ‘Thread Bearing Witness’. Exhibited at Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester, the collection considers cultural heritage, refugee displacement and movement within the context of the global refugee crisis.

     

    'Thread Bearing Witness' at Whitworth Art Gallery

     

    As a highly regarded contemporary artist, Kettle’s focus is upon stitched textiles which she uses to explore such predominant themes. The walls surrounding the exhibition are painted in ‘Shirting’, a pure white which provides the perfect neutral backdrop.

     

    'Thread Bearing Witness' at Whitworth Art Gallery
    'Thread Bearing Witness' at Whitworth Art Gallery

     

    Alice Kettle said: “Textiles make connections with home and community. In its substance it maps our cultural identities. I cannot be an observer; textiles are a way to engage, to show I care in a meaningful way, in a medium where I have a voice. I want to help and make a difference, maybe like all mothers do for their children.”

     

    'Thread Bearing Witness' at Whitworth Art Gallery

     

    Thread Bearing Witness is being exhibited at Whitworth Art Gallery until 24th February 2019.

  • London Wallpapers V Press Preview

     

    T'Cup Café, Paris

     

    We recently invited journalists in Paris to a preview of our latest wallpaper collection, ‘London Wallpapers V’, at T’Cup café. The journalists attended from 9am to 3pm on Thursday 22nd November, where they browsed the new designs over brunch.

     

    London Wallpapers V Press Preview

     

    T’Cup Café in the Le Marais district in Paris was decorated with dresses made using 7 of the new wallpapers which were displayed from the ceiling.

     

    Wallpaper dress: Lansdowne Walk - Ash & Lansdowne Walk - Pollen

     

    Wallpaper dresses

     

    Managing Director David Mottershead presented the collection alongside Marketing Director Ruth Mottershead, providing journalists with the history of each design.

     

    London Wallpapers V Press Preview

     

    London Wallpapers V will be launched at Paris Déco Off on 21st January 2019.

  • London Wallpapers V - January 2019

     

    Carlton House Terrace - Blue Plume

     

    January 2019 will see the launch of our 13th wallpaper collection, London Wallpapers V - a compendium of heritage designs.

    Spanning 250 years of interior decoration (from 1690 to the mid 20th century), ‘London Wallpapers V’ is a compendium of authentic heritage designs, each one sensitively remodelled and expertly coloured for the 21st century home.

    With one exception, the 11 designs in the collection are based on fragments stored in English Heritage’s wallpaper archive at Wrest Park in Bedfordshire, which were removed and preserved during the conservation of 18th and 19th century London houses.

     

    Brodsworth - Empress

     

    The exception is a first for Little Greene and English Heritage – the original design still hangs on the walls at Brodsworth Hall, an elegant and faithfully conserved Victorian country house in South Yorkshire.

    The collection will be launched at Déco Off in Paris and available to order online and through our network of stockists from January 21st.

    Follow us on Instagram for exclusive previews of the new collection.

  • Using Green

     

     

    North Brink Grey, Putti and Ulla are grey-greens that provide a harmonious neutral colour scheme when used in combination.

     

     

    Hidey Hole was discovered at George Bernard Shaw’s Hertfordshire residence in a small hut where Shaw found the tranquillity to write. With turquoise undertones, it works perfectly as an elegant all over scheme.

     

     

    The deep green-blue of Harley Green was found in the Library of Wimpole Hall, the largest house in Cambridge. Combine with Tea with Florence for a contemporary kitchen scheme.

     

     

    Ho Ho Green is perfect for use both within the home and to provide a warm welcome on the exterior of a property. The shade was originally depicted within the mythical Ho Ho birds in the hand-painted Chinese wallpaper at Nostell Priory.

     

     

    The bright Sage & Onions is the original colour of the garden gate at Beatrix Potter’s farm. Add a colour highlight to this bold finish with  a stripe of Tea with Florence.

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